In African-American Children, Researchers Identify First Genetic Mutations Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

Medindia Health News
Medindia largest health website in india. // via fulltextrssfeed.com 
The Best Way to Manage your Money.

Start using Mint today to set a budget, track your goals and do more with your money.

From our sponsors

In African-American Children, Researchers Identify First Genetic Mutations Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

Nov 15th 2013, 19:03

A new report by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that loss-of-function mutations to Filaggrin-2 (FLG2), a gene that creates a protein responsible for retaining moisture and protecting the skin from environmental irritants, were associated with atopic dermatitis in African American children. The study, the first report to deduce the mechanism responsible for the persistent form of the condition in African American children, was published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Nearly half of people with atopic dermatitis in the United States are African-American children. Previous studies have shown than those of African descent do not usually carry a mutation to the filaggrin gene (FLG) that has been associated with the risk of onset and persistence of AD in those of European and Asian ancestry.

“This finding helps confirm that skin barrier proteins are important in Atopic Dermatitis for people of all ancestries,” said lead study author David Margolis, MD, PhD, professor of Dermatology and Epidemiology. “It could also lead to a way to determine which children are most likely to have persistent flare ups throughout their lives.”

The team evaluated DNA from 299 African American children, none of whom had experienced skin free of symptoms of AD while not on medication in the previous 6 months. Within the group, researchers discovered that children with either one of two FLG2 mutations – rs12568784 or rs16833974 – were more than 50 percent more likely to have persistent AD than those without the mutations.

Future research will work to better understand mutations of FLG2 and determine if they result in functional changes to the FLG2 protein. In addition, the team is continuing research into mechanisms that may turn off the immune response to irritants that pass through the dysfunctional skin barrier and incite the inflammatory response seen in AD.

Source: Eurekalert

You are receiving this email because you subscribed to this feed at blogtrottr.com.

If you no longer wish to receive these emails, you can unsubscribe from this feed, or manage all your subscriptions

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: